There are over 30 "sponge cities" in China that are helping to clean up the environment

There are over 30 "sponge cities" in China that are helping to clean up the environment

Throughout the world, cities are struggling to deal with urban migration and development in flood-ridden areas — China faced this issue most prominently during the devastating floods in Guangzhou in 2010 and Beijing in 2012 and Chongqing, while India is dealing with the influx of unregulated development in the wetlands. Urban flooding and issues with groundwater collection are becoming major issues not only in Asia, but in cities everywhere as they struggle to come with worsening flood impacts.

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Mark Zuckerberg's 2019 New Year's challenge is to talk to the public more

Mark Zuckerberg's 2019 New Year's challenge is to talk to the public more

In 2018 he pledged to “fix” Facebook and now for Mark Zuckerberg’s 2019 resolution, he’s aiming to host public talks about the future of technology, Zuck, who isn’t traditionally one to be in the spotlight or to make public appearances, will meet each few weeks with leaders, experts and community members from Facebook to talk about the “opportunities, the challenges, the hopes, and the anxieties” that impact the work his company does, he explained in a Facebook post on January 8.

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San Francisco just removed parking requirements on new developments and other cities should take note

San Francisco just removed parking requirements on new developments and other cities should take note

Throughout the United States, cities are built with parking and automobiles in mind — but with public transportation being better for the environment and for cities, they’re slowly correcting this mistake. On January 20, a new bylaw will go into effect in San Francisco eliminating the minimum parking requirements citywide, which was unanimously recommended after a review of the city’s transit, walking and cycling corridors. It will become the first city to remove minimum parking requirements for new housing and will greatly help with the new “transit first” policy.

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A few questions that Toronto's SmartTrack project brings up

A few questions that Toronto's SmartTrack project brings up

The City of Toronto, Metrolinx and the TTC have been working on their GO Regional Express Rail and SmartTrack projects since 2015, with them blending with each other to offer not much differentiation between the two. Even though the latter has been pared down significantly since it was proposed by John Tory as part of his campaign for mayorship in 2014, it’s still going strong and remains a centrepiece of his second term.

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The Bitcoin bubble has finally popped

The Bitcoin bubble has finally popped

With every economic boom comes the theory that a crash is impossible — a bubble, as most call it — that leads most people to believe that it’s permanent. In October, 1929, economist Irving Fisher wrote in The New York Times that stocks had “reached what looks like a permanently high plateau", only days before the beginning of the Great Depression. Most recently in 2017, John McAfee wrote on Twitter that “those of you in the old school who believe this is a bubble simply have not understood the new mathematics of the Blockchain”, while the value of Bitcoin now hovers at less than $4,000 USD.

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For most people, $1000 would be enough to convince them to quit Facebook

For most people, $1000 would be enough to convince them to quit Facebook

There’s more than 2.27 billion monthly users of Facebook — but since the company doesn’t charge for people to use its services, it can be hard to understand how much people actually value the service. However a new study has revealed that a Facebook user would need to be paid around $1,000 to deactivate their account for a year, while students would be willing to for an average of $200.

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What is talc and why is it all over the news?

What is talc and why is it all over the news?

More than 11,700 women have sued Johnson & Johnson over accusations that the talc used in its Baby Powder product caused their ovarian cancer — and they now have a legal front due to a $4.69 billion lawsuit against the company by 22 women that went in favour of the latter. Due to the lawsuit old company documents from J&J ended up in the hands of the public and were reported on by Reuters, who alleged that it’s “impossible” to completely purify mined talc and that tests for asbestos can’t be completely accurately.

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North Carolina is experiencing election fraud, not voter fraud

North Carolina is experiencing election fraud, not voter fraud

The investigation into the purported election fraud involving absentee ballots in North Carolina is still ongoing, with it now focusing on absentee ballots that were unreturned. The investigation is focusing on Leslie McCrae Dowless Jr., a contractor for the Red Dome Group that paid her for “get out the vote” efforts in the 9th District — which Republican Mark Harris hired for “get out the vote” promotion in the 9th District. Harris unofficially won the election by 905 votes and by 60 percent of the Bladen County absentee vote, even though only 19 percent of voters identified as Republican.

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The latest moves in Doug Ford's plan to make Ontario "open-for-business"

The latest moves in Doug Ford's plan to make Ontario "open-for-business"

The PC government of Ontario, being led by Doug Ford, promised to find billions of dollars in “efficiencies” in the provincial budget to remove. He’s continuously spewed out this line time after time, accusing the previous government of not being interested in and not allowing for businesses to operate in the province — which seems illogical and doesn’t make much sense.

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When it seems like things can't get worse for MoviePass, they do

Just last October, Helios and Matheson — the parent company of MoviePass, a movie subscription service that initially let users see unlimited movies for $9.95 per month — was celebrating a 52-week high stock price of $38.86. People loved the service and it was expecting to have five million subscribers by the end of 2018, hitting three million in June. The concept of MoviePass — unlimited movies at a set price each month — disrupted the movie industry, sparking the launch of AMC’s Stubs A-List, Cinemark Movie Club and Sinemia.

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In spite of the national government, Chinese provinces are building coal plants in secret

In spite of the national government, Chinese provinces are building coal plants in secret

Provincial governments in China are battling with the Communist Party to build more power plants powered by coal, even though the country pledged in 2016 to reduce carbon emissions by 18 percent by 2020. declaring a “war on pollution”. Between 2014 and 2016, provincial authorities throughout the country issued permits for construction of brand new coal power plants, totalling more than 259 gigawatts of capacity.

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The main takeaways from Facebook's internal documents that the UK released

The main takeaways from Facebook's internal documents that the UK released

British Parliament published a 250-page internal Facebook document on the Digital, Culture, Media, and Sport Committee website, which is investigating the company’s privacy standards as a portion of its report on disinformation and fake news. Previously the documents had been sealed in US courts, but they can now provide a rare look into Facebook’s policies on privacy, user data, how it handles competitors and more.

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Earth's snow-sticken landscapes throughout history, as seen from space

Earth's snow-sticken landscapes throughout history, as seen from space

People often are relatively one-sided on winter debate — either they love the snowy weather or loathe it — but that doesn’t mean everybody can’t enjoy it. The NASA website is home to hundreds of aerial images of snow-peaked mountains, frozen rivers and more that make up dazzling designs in unbelievable colours. You don’t even have to leave the comfort of your bed to enjoy them.

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We still don't know whether the Saudi Crown Prince was involved in the Jamal Khashoggi murder

We still don't know whether the Saudi Crown Prince was involved in the Jamal  Khashoggi murder

There’s still a lot of confusion and unanswered questions about the killing of Jamal Khashoggi on 2 October, a Washington Post journalist and critic of the Saudi government who was murdered when he walked into the country’s consulate in Istanbul. Officially the claim is that he was killed by orders of an intelligence officer, but Turkish officials provided recorded evidence to Britain, the US, Germany and France that the journalist was killed on orders of someone from one of the highest levels of government.

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US shoppers are expected to spend more than ever this holiday season, hitting $1 trillion

US shoppers are expected to spend more than ever this holiday season, hitting $1 trillion

In the US customers could spend more than $1 trillion during the holiday season, according to market research firm eMarketer, the first time retail sales have surpassed this amount.This will be a 5.8 percent increase from 2017 when consumers spent a total of 947.55 million between 1 Nov. and 31 Dec. The lowest unemployment rates since 1970, steady incomes and higher consumer confidence are being credited for this hike in spending — and because retailers won’t be passing on price increases due to Donald Trump’s tariffs until next year, this means spending will remain strong.

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The least sexy thing about Victoria's Secret is its insensitivity

The least sexy thing about Victoria's Secret is its insensitivity

The Victoria’s Secret televised runway show has been the biggest and most successful event the company has put on since it began in 1995 — with people watching it for the star-studded performances, spectacle of supermodels dressed as “angels”, or for the small intimates being strutted down the runway.However, the company is struggling under pressure from millennial-oriented brands like ThirdLove and American Eagle’s Aerie division and in July, announced that due to weak sales, it would have to extend its semi-annual sale by two weeks and offer higher discounts. It’s also closing 20 stores that are suffering from poor sales and has seen its stock drop from an all-time high of $99.41 on December 4, 2015 to an average of $30.

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The United Kingdom's deregulated bus system and why it's a big flop, explained

The United Kingdom's deregulated bus system and why it's a big flop, explained

Buses in the UK are the most commonly used mode of public transportation, with 4.44 billion trips being made in England in the 2016/2017 reporting period ending in March, with journeys inside London accounting for half the country’s total. Local bus services across the Great Britain — made up of England, Wales and Scotland — accounted for 59.2 percent of all public transportation trips, compared to only 20.7 percent for the National Rail network.

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Forget Black Friday — Single's Day is the biggest shopping event in the world

Forget Black Friday — Single's Day is the biggest shopping event in the world

When midnight hit on 11 November, the world’s biggest shopping event began — not Black Friday as some people might rightly assume, but Single’s Day, a Chinese shopping extravaganza. Started in 1993 as a day for university students to celebrate being single, it was then soon promoted by Alibaba’s Tmall service, transforming into a massive 20-day shopping festival.

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Uber is lobbying for a congestion charge in NYC — but whether it will work is uncertain

Uber is lobbying for a congestion charge in NYC — but whether it will work is uncertain

Two months ago New York City approved a limit on the number of Uber, Lyft and other on-demand ride services and voted to halt issuing for-hire licenses for 12 months while it studies the industry in more detail. During the cap, both companies will still be granted licenses for wheelchair-accessible vehicles and by 2021, 25 percent of vehicles in their fleet will be required to be wheelchair accessible, which Uber isn’t happy about. Now Uber is putting its money and resources into helping fix New York City’s traffic congestion problem, by investing $10 million over three years on a “campaign for sustainable mobility” — with the centrepiece being congestion pricing in high-density parts of the city. This is surprising, coming from a company that accounts for 65,000 of the 103,000 for-hire vehicles in NYC.

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The economics of how low-budget airlines are so inexpensive

The economics of how low-budget airlines are so inexpensive

It seems incredible how cheap plane tickets can be on so-called low-cost airlines — $35 for a week in Barcelona, Budapest or Milan, $153 to Moscow or $437 to New York City. These airlines, usually based in Europe, can offer vastly lower prices than their competitors by slashing costs at every possible turn, while still making a healthy profit in the process. Low-cost airlines are dangerous for traditional companies that have been around for a long time because, by simply setting up a route along the same path as them, they force fares to drop which cuts into profits of the larger airline.

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