A brief timeline of Facebook's recent privacy issues

A brief timeline of Facebook's recent privacy issues

It seems like Facebook has been battling crisis after crisis over the numerous privacy issues it has had to deal with in the last year. But the company has never been too good at privacy — after all, when we share more, the company is able to make more money — and it all started back in 2006, just when the company was getting its footing. This all caused the FTC to become involved, launching a lawsuit that forced the company to not make “misrepresentations about the privacy or security of consumers' personal information” and “obtain consumers' affirmative express consent before enacting changes that override their privacy preferences.” Now because of the recent issues Facebook has faced, the company is being re-examined for breaking its promises.

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The SEC is suing Kik over its crypto ICO

Kik Interactive is being sued by the US Securities and Exchange Commission over its 2017 initial coin offering that raised $100 million in what the agency says is unregistered securities. $55 million was raised from US investors, according to the SEC statement released this week, which alleges that the one trillion tokens sold count as a security and therefore, should have been registered with the government.

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Canada and the US, among others, are nowhere near reaching the Paris Agreement climate change goals

Canada and the US, among others, are nowhere near reaching the Paris Agreement climate change goals

The landmark Paris Climate Agreement, signed in 2016, is supposed to push countries to lower their greenhouse gas emissions to levels which won’t cause catastrophic damage. But, according to Climate Action Tracker, many of the 200 countries that signed the agreement are failing to live up to their self-imposed goals — including all of the world’s top 10 biggest polluters.

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The downfall of WOW Air is really going to harm Iceland

The downfall of WOW Air is really going to harm Iceland

Iceland-based WOW Air went suddenly bankrupt at the end of March, leaving thousands of passengers stranded throughout the world. But now we’re seeing how much the airline’s shutdown has impacted Iceland’s economy. The central bank in Iceland has announced that the previously predicted 1.8 percent increase in the economy will now be a 0.4 percent decrease, stating that the “deterioration in the outlook is due primarily to a contraction in tourism,” alongside a decrease in marine product exports.

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While the wait list for social housing in Toronto increases, the number of units available doesn't

While the wait list for social housing in Toronto increases, the number of units available doesn't

Back in December, Toronto councillors voted to use 11 city-owned surplus plots of land to build new affordable housing — something that is much needed in a city with more than 105,000 people on the waitlist in Q4 2018; one where most of the affordable housing units were built in the late 80-90s. It’s difficult to estimate how many affordable housing units are in the city because of a patchwork of multiple waitlists, but most belong to Toronto Community Housing as either geared-to-income (30 percent of monthly household income before tax), affordable or market rent units. But, a housing market analysis report produced by the city in February explains the need for more affordable housing.

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Companies are rushing to donate money to Notre-Dame rebuild efforts

Companies are rushing to donate money to Notre-Dame rebuild efforts

Hundreds of millions of dollars are pouring in from companies around the world to rebuild the Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris, after French President Emmanuel Macron vowed to rebuild the cathedral within five years. The donations—which have totalled nearly a billion dollars—are raising questions from charities and politicians, who are wondering if tax breaks are the main reason why so much is being donated, Reuters explains.

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With IPOs in 2019, losses are the new normal

With IPOs in 2019, losses are the new normal

If there’s anything to learn from IPO’s in 2019—from Lyft and Uber’s already released S-1 filings to rumours that Pinterest and Postmates will go public—it’s that it is looking to be a big year for money-losing tech companies. Losses are the new normal for companies going public, reports the Wall Street Journal, with 83 percent of IPOs in the US happening within the first three quarters of 2018 losing money in the prior 12 months.

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Amazon's cashless stores might not remain cashless for much longer

Amazon's cashless stores might not remain cashless for much longer

Not everybody is happy that stores are beginning to ban cash payments, Amazon is now discovering as it works to accept cash at its previously cashless Amazon Go stores. The stores began popping up a year ago — allowing people to purchase snacks, pre-made meals and other assorted goods without interacting with anybody — but now legislation and backlash is catching up with the company.

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With $200 million already spent, Doug Ford is still interested in changing Toronto transit plans

With $200 million already spent, Doug Ford is still interested in changing Toronto transit plans

The provincial government is prepared to fund major transit projects in Toronto — including a three stop Scarborough subway extension, Eglinton West extension, Relief Line South and Yonge subway extension to Richmond Hill — but only if it has control over them. This is according a letter sent to TTC Chief Executive Officer Rick Leary and City Manager, dated March 22, and a follow-up letter dated March 26. The letters outlined some large differences between the city and province when it comes to major transit projects.

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The 'no card, no checkout' cashless culture is going to hurt the homeless and elderly

The 'no card, no checkout' cashless culture is going to hurt the homeless and elderly

In 2018, online retail conglomerate Amazon opened its first GO store to the public — the first real example of a cashless store in action, sparking off a wave of inspiration for the likes of Everlane at their NYC location, the Sam’s Club Now store in Dallas and even United and Delta ticket counters at airports. But ‘cashless culture’ will have repercussions for the homeless and elderly — two groups of people who are more likely to be without a bank account and therefore, less likely to have access to a credit or debit card to pay.

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What to do if your flight is cancelled or delayed

What to do if your flight is cancelled or delayed

Flight delays and cancellations definitely aren’t something people expect and can often leave people feeling helpless and stranded — both literally and physically. Considering the number of people flying each day it’s safe to assume that at one point, you might experience a flight delay, but many people don’t realize (unless the airline volunteers the information) that they’re entitled to compensation, meal vouchers, hotel vouchers, or a combination of all three.

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Airbnb is going all-in on the war against cities

Airbnb is going all-in on the war against cities

“Read my lips, we want to pay taxes,” said Chris Lehane to the US Conference of Mayors in 2016 on behalf of Airbnb. The home-sharing service has since shouted the declaration from everywhere it can — press releases, emails and billboards, begging mayors to let the company collect millions in unpaid hotel taxes on behalf of cities.

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Where the boeing 737 MAX 8 is grounded and what airlines use it most

Where the boeing 737 MAX 8 is grounded and what airlines use it most

The world is on the edge following the tragic crash of Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302 on Sunday — a flight from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia to Nairobi, Kenya, in which all 157 people onboard were killed, including seven crew members, a security official and 19 UN staff members. The pilot requested to return to the airport when the plane started experiencing technical issues and the control tower lost contact with the plane at 8:44 am, with wreckage discovered near Bishoftu later, 62 kilometres from where the plane took off from, The Guardian explains. On Twitter, flight tracking website Flight Radar tweeted “that vertical speed was unstable after take off”.

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Some of these portraits are real, but good luck trying to figure out which actually are

Some of these portraits are real, but good luck trying to figure out which actually are

Researchers at the University of Washington have created the website, Which Face is Real, in an effort to quiz and bring attention to the fact that AI is now able to create “photographs” of people who don’t actually exist. The duo behind the website, Jevin West and Carl Bergstrom, point out that while we’ve been conditioned to tell the difference between reputable and spam accounts online based on their username — you probably would ignore a Twitter user who still has the egg image as their picture, after all — pictures are a bit different and are more difficult to analyze.

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This is what is happening when the TTC is experiencing "signal delays"

This is what is happening when the TTC is experiencing "signal delays"

It's an occurrence that happens regularly on the Toronto Transit Commission, happening at any time — the dreaded “Line 1 is delayed due to signal issues” message over the PA system. The TTC runs mainly on an outdated backend system and because it cost so much to replace it, it could be decades before the whole system has it installed. In a nutshell, the important thing to remember is delays generally happen because of all the moving parts that make up the traditional signalling systems — once ATC is implemented systemwide and computers are controlling the signals, this should cease to be an issue.

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Crossing the border with Global Entry, Nexus and PreCheck, explained

Crossing the border with Global Entry, Nexus and PreCheck, explained

Frequent travellers will know the joy of belonging to an expedited screening program — but they also know that between Global Entry, TSA PreCheck, Nexus and Sentri, the options are confusing. But once you’ve figured out which program is the best fit for you (for which the Department of Homeland Security has a handy quiz), paid the membership fee and, in some cases, gone in for an interview, it’s easy sailing.

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The EU is introducing tech that will limit speeding and, hopefully, save lives

The EU is introducing tech that will limit speeding and, hopefully, save lives

Technology to limit the speed of vehicles has been around for decades and though the EU consulted with its member countries on the option of introducing the technology in vehicles — with an overwhelming 82 percent vote in favour — only commercial vehicles were considered at the time. This will soon change, however, with the commission proposing the life-saving speed control system to be installed in all new cars in an effort to cut down on the number of speeding-related deaths and incidents throughout the continent.

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Many of the Netflix 'Original' series aren't actually made by the company

Many of the Netflix 'Original' series aren't actually made by the company

Netflix spends a lot of money on producing its ‘“Original” programming and as of 2018, is using 85 percent of new spending for original projects, including TV shows, films and other productions. The company has seen massive success with its large slate of programming, ranging from House of Cards to The Good Place and Black Mirror.

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Facebook's third-party content moderators end up developing PTSD from their job

Earlier this week The Verge released an incredibly in-depth report on the workplace conditions of the content moderators Facebook employs — though they are technically employed by Cognizant, a third-party company — and detailed how they end up being around conspiracy theories that they begin to believe them, going as far as to develop PTSD-like symptoms.

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