Zuckerberg's Facebook testimony was either a disaster or success, depending on how you look at it

Zuckerberg's Facebook testimony was either a disaster or success, depending on how you look at it

Though the hearings could  be considered a utter disaster when you take into account he fact that most people asking the questions were ill-informed, unprepared and just stupid. But in the same sense the purpose of the hearings was to provide some clarity of how the company operates, and in the process the value of Facebook rose more than $17 billion

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Shelter usage in Toronto is on the rise

During the winter officials in the city opened up temporary homeless shelters to cope with the additional demand on the shelter system from the cold weather, but it sheds a light on the city's housing crisis. Homelessness, after all, is caused by a lack of housing, and cities like Montreal, Edmonton and Hamilton have avoided this sort of emergencies by putting more effort into finding housing for the homeless.

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The art of the #SideHustle and what it's like to make a magazine

Well I took a stab at creating a magazine using some of the old work I've created over the last year, and it doesn't look horrible (though it's a bit rough around the edges!). As someone with an interest in the print side of journalism, it was really a fun task creating this and though it's not long enough to be printed as a hard-copy, it's still a neat little project to have stored on my computer somewhere.

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In the name of net neutrality, Wikipedia ends its zero-rated program

In the name of net neutrality, Wikipedia ends its zero-rated program

Wikipedia recently announced they would be discontinuing the Wikipedia Zero program, which in it s six years of existence helped over 800 million people in developing countries access the website for free. The program had provided people in 72 countries with access to the service, without it counting towards their data caps.

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MoviePass has customers, but now they need to make money

Last summer, MoviePass introduced a seemingly impossible-to-pass-up offer. For less than the price of a movie ticket (depending on where you're located), you can see one per calendar day in a movie theatre. The easy part for the team behind the service was getting people to sign up for it. Now they've got to make money off their customers, and we're finally learning how that'll all work.

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Minimum wage was never intended for people to live on

When a government tells businesses how much they must pay employees, it runs the risk of decreasing the amount of positions available or eliminating them altogether. Most businesses are comfortable with paying their employees a reasonable and accessible wage, but when the minimum gets hiked up, they tend to look at automating aspects of the workplace to eliminate human employees.

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With Metrolinx' new Bombardier contract, streetcars are oddly more expensive than before

With Metrolinx' new Bombardier contract, streetcars are oddly more expensive than before

Toronto's regional transportation planning agency, Metrolinx, is cutting its order of low-floor streetcars from Bombardier Transportation in more than half. The initial order for 182 vehicles has been lowered to to 76, a reduction of 106 vehicles that were intended to run on the Eglinton Crosstown, Finch West and other light rail transit lines throughout Toronto.

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