Fraudster Elizabeth Holmes is starting a new business, Ontario sees the highest voter turnout since 1999 and no NAFTA deal is better than a bad one

You've probably heard about Theranos before; the startup run by Elizabeth Holmes that aimed to make blood tests simple and painless but turned out to be a massive fraud scheme. Well, Holmes is now seeking to start a new company and is asking for funding which she, oddly enough, actually get. This just goes to prove that all you need to be successful in Silicon Valley is a poker face. In other news, Apple has been served with a lawsuit over the butterfly keyboard that it released in 2015, citing a higher-than-normal breakdown rate as the main driver. Finally, the province of Ontario is being led by Doug Ford now (yelp!) so we're accepting condolences at this time.

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Singapore built a town just for self-driving buses and because of the US, Mexico is having a gun crisis

There's still lots of businesses rushing to implement the changes required under GDPR, a new set of laws in the EU that govern everything people do online and how businesses are allowed to use their data. If it sounds like hard work to abide by, that's because it is, and many businesses are failing to comply as a result (even though they had more than two years to make the appropriate changes). These regulations are good for consumers because it limits what information is allowed to be collected by businesses and requires disclosure of the data collected, something that might prove very popular in Canada and the US as we see how our neighbours across the pond reap the benefits of tighter laws.

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Nobody's ready for GDPR, Car2Go is shutting down in Toronto and the US Government lost track of 1,500 children

There's still lots of businesses rushing to implement the changes required under GDPR, a new set of laws in the EU that govern everything people do online and how businesses are allowed to use their data. If it sounds like hard work to abide by, that's because it is, and many businesses are failing to comply as a result (even though they had more than two years to make the appropriate changes). These regulations are good for consumers because it limits what information is allowed to be collected by businesses and requires disclosure of the data collected, something that might prove very popular in Canada and the US as we see how our neighbours across the pond reap the benefits of tighter laws.

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Free public transit can work, as evident from Estonia

There's been numerous debates before about whether transit should be free, and there's numerous benefits associated with it: not only does it reduce pollution, but better access means a stronger job market and health benefits too. Stockholm, for instance, is home to a large amount of fare dodgers who illustrate how this wouldn't be an issue if taking the subway was free and paid for indirectly instead of each time you ride. German cities are trialling it too, to cut down on pollution in the country.

Making public transit fare-free will always be a huge issue, because though the middle and lower class would welcome the change, there's always going to be someone opposing the move.

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Google embraces AI in all its products

The highlight of this week is Google's annual I/O event where they announce major projects they've been working on, and this year they did not disappoint. In keeping with its embrace of AI, the company announced Google Duplex, a service that has the capability of making calls to businesses and other people while sounding completely natural. Snapchat is releasing a redesign of its redesigned app, and there have been sadly three bombings in Indonesia this week carried out by suicide bombers.

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Some doctors have found loopholes to do illegal crimes and nutrition labels are coming to fast food joints

There's quite a bit going on this week with Google hosting their annual I/O event tomorrow and Ford, Wynne and Horwath hitting it off in the first Ontario election debate. But there's also several larger international stories this week that deserve attention too, like the headlining one highlighting the Toronto Star's investigation into doctors doing illegal things in the US like rape, then coming to Canada without having to disclose that information, or São Paulo's metro system spying (quite literally) on its customers without their knowledge.

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SmartTrack isn't like it was supposed to be and Sprint and T-Mobile are merging

There's been so much that's happened this week in the world that it's hard to sum it all up. Zuckerberg finished his testimony a couple weeks ago and Facebook is now in high-speed mode to fix the damage it's done, but it might be too late for that now. There's a small town in the northernmost part of Alaska where the temperatures are rising so fast, algorithms thought the data collected was fake and there's a huge nation-sized mass of plastic floating around in the Pacific Ocean that's a good look at how our world will end up if we don't curb our waste now. In local news, Toronto voted for SmartTrack to be built, but it's nothing like how it was supposed to look or be designed.

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With all eyes on Facebook, nobody is paying attention to how Google handles data

I won't hide the fact that I'm really bad at sending out these email blasts because, to be completely honest, I am. Recently I've learned how difficult it can be to manage all the fuss in life, but that's exactly what I had planned for this email to do for all of you. Once again, here is your email brief for the week, along with my promise to send these more often, as initially promised.

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Elizabeth Holmes lost her voting rights at Theranos and Uber bought a bike-share startup

I accidentally skipped the email last Monday, but I'm back. This week there's been a lot of news with Facebook being accused of political interference (again) and Snapchat laying off 10 percent of its staff after having an unsuccessful year. The most important news, however, is that electricity costs could rise for communities where bitcoin mining companies set up shop.

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Bitcoin companies are making power more expensive

I accidentally skipped the email last Monday, but I'm back. This week there's been a lot of news with Facebook being accused of political interference (again) and Snapchat laying off 10 percent of its staff after having an unsuccessful year. The most important news, however, is that electricity costs could rise for communities where bitcoin mining companies set up shop.

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