Fraudster Elizabeth Holmes is starting a new business, Ontario sees the highest voter turnout since 1999 and no NAFTA deal is better than a bad one

You've probably heard about Theranos before; the startup run by Elizabeth Holmes that aimed to make blood tests simple and painless but turned out to be a massive fraud scheme. Well, Holmes is now seeking to start a new company and is asking for funding which she, oddly enough, actually get. This just goes to prove that all you need to be successful in Silicon Valley is a poker face. In other news, Apple has been served with a lawsuit over the butterfly keyboard that it released in 2015, citing a higher-than-normal breakdown rate as the main driver. Finally, the province of Ontario is being led by Doug Ford now (yelp!) so we're accepting condolences at this time.

Elizabeth Holmes, CEO and founder of the fraud startup Theranos, is trying to start a new company

 πŸ“Έ:  Flickr

πŸ“Έ: Flickr

Theranos is a mastermind tale of Silicon Valley fraud, started by a 19-year-old Stanford dropout who was set on saving the world by inventing a new type of blood testing. For years, Holmes was praised by the media and called "the next Steve Jobs," riding the fame until she was found to be deceptive, embellished and an outright liar. The company she built was essentially a giant tangle of lies: falsifying customer's blood tests at Walgreens, firing the CFO when he found out and lying about the revenue it made in 2014 (she told investors Theranos was on track to make $100 million, but it only made $100,000) and telling the press that the technology was being used on the battlefield when it was not.

The Wall Street Journal's John Carreyrou went as far as to say "she absolutely sociopathic tendencies," but apparently this isn't stopping her from trying to start a new company and she might just be able to raise capital for it, too. Venture capitalists like Tim Draper (an early Theranos investor) are still rooting for Holmes and believe she did nothing wrong.

Noteworthy Read

Last month Apple was served a class action lawsuit over the butterfly-switch keyboards that have been causing issues since they were released in 2015. The Outline reported that staff at repair stores responsible for diagnosing the computers would attribute dead keys and double-spacing spacebars to a "piece of dust" under the keyboard. Under warranty, Geniuses can replace the top case of the computer in around a week but out of warranty, customers have to fork over $700 for this privilege.

The company has yet to comment on the issue, but in an AppleInsider investigation, they found that MacBook Pro keyboards produced in 2016 were failing twice as much as older ones. This problem has become so bad that a petition was started to demand the issues be addressed, gaining more than 30,000 signatures.

Number of the week

The latest Ontario provincial election saw the highest voter turnout since 1999, with 58 percent of eligible voters casting their ballots, according to Elections Ontario. The PC's, led by Doug Ford, won a 76-seat majority and the NDP will form the opposition with 40 seats. Liberals, with only seven seats, lost official party status. Though the 2018 results are unofficial, this marks the highest voter turnout since the 1999 election.

Voter turnout in Ontario elections in percentages

Ford's party, pushing the message of change, led to it winning in rural strongholds and the suburbs, while the NDP party gained popularity in downtown ridings, working-class districts and in the north. The Green party came out successful in Guelph, which has caused speculation that his party might join forces with the Liberals (but it won't).

In case you missed it

- Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he would rather see no NAFTA deal than a bad one, believing a win-win-win deal is still possible between Canada, the US and Mexico. β€œWe are not going to move ahead just for the sake of moving ahead," he said.

- The California Senate has voted to approve a bill that will reinstate net neutrality regulations that were repealed by the FCC in December. Bill S.B. 822 was approved 23-12 and will forbid ISP's from throttling or blocking online content and requires them to treat everything on the internet equally. It also bans them from participating in "zero-rating" programs where certain services don't count towards caps, which the EFF called a "gold standard" regulation.

- Crayola has launched a makeup line called Crayola Beauty, which is exclusively available from Asos. The vegan makeup lineup includes eyeshadows, blushes, mascaras and more that come in 95 shades, ranging from $15-40.

- The US government will ask about citizenship in the 2020 census, citing a need for more accurate citizenship data as the reasoning. This question was requested by the Justice Department which says it needs more data to better enforce the Voting Rights Act's provisions against racial discrimination, even though the question hasn't been asked since 1950. Numerous cities and states are critical of the addition and reasoning behind it, which could deter non-citizens from filling out the census.