Amazon

Amazon's cashless stores might not remain cashless for much longer

Amazon's cashless stores might not remain cashless for much longer

Not everybody is happy that stores are beginning to ban cash payments, Amazon is now discovering as it works to accept cash at its previously cashless Amazon Go stores. The stores began popping up a year ago — allowing people to purchase snacks, pre-made meals and other assorted goods without interacting with anybody — but now legislation and backlash is catching up with the company.

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Google is slowly creeping up on Amazon in the smart speaker market

Google is slowly creeping up on Amazon in the smart speaker market

Since introducing the first modern smart speaker a couple years ago with the Echo product line, Amazon has maintained a steady dominance in the market. The company sold an estimated 4.8 million Echo devices between April and June, beating Google by 1.6 million units. However, Google has been gaining ground on its closest rival, growing its market share from 16.1 percent in Q2 2017 to 27.6 percent in the same quarter one year later. Apple's recently introduced HomePod speaker isn't even a true competitor to the two companies, only shipping an estimated 700,000 units between April and the end of June.

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Experts are concerned that Amazon is becoming a monopoly and Prime Day is proof of it

Experts are concerned that Amazon is becoming a monopoly and Prime Day is proof of it

Yesterday was Amazon Prime Day, the e-commerce giant's fictitious summer shopping holiday that draws millions of its loyal subscribers to purchase products at a discount and even more people to sign up for the service. The day is a big deal to shoppers but is worrying to critics — the company sells so many different products and attracts millions of loyal shoppers that it invented its own version of Black Friday, dictated that businesses have to offer discounts on that day and forced other companies, such as Walmart and eBay, to follow suit.

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Seattle is repealing the proposed head tax it was going to fight homelessness with

Seattle is repealing the proposed head tax it was going to fight homelessness with

Just a month ago, Seattle proposed a tax on large companies making over $20 million per year — affecting around 585 businesses in the city and costing them $0.26 per hour, per employee. These businesses, including Amazon, Starbucks, Expedia and Alaska Airlines would pay the government a maximum of $500 for each person employed, per year, with 75 percent of the money going towards affordable housing and the rest aimed at helping the homeless. However, the proposal is now being repealed after the city faced pressure from numerous businesses to do so. The city leaders abandoning the head tax goes to show how powerful Amazon is in rallying opposition against taxes from all levels of government, even in a city with one of the highest homelessness rates in the US.

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