Environment

Throughout the world, EV ownership is on the rise

Throughout the world, EV ownership is on the rise

The Norwegian government has set an ambitious goal of 2025 for all new vehicles produced to be zero-emission ones β€” a more lofty goal than Canada or the United Kingdom’s goal of 2040. Norway is already doing an impressive job at promoting and incentivising EVs over traditional vehicles, working to make it cheaper to own an electric vehicle, while making it more expensive to own one that uses petrol.

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How to ensure your recycling actually gets recycled

How to ensure your recycling actually gets recycled

We’ve all had that experience before β€” being unsure of whether something goes in the recycling bin, to an electronics recycling facility or to the dump, we throw it into one bin, hoping it is the correct one. While this might seem simple enough, single-stream recycling is to blame for a big increase in contamination of recycling, forcing facilities to have to toss the batch in the trash instead of being able to properly break it down.

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There are over 30 "sponge cities" in China that are helping to clean up the environment

There are over 30 "sponge cities" in China that are helping to clean up the environment

Throughout the world, cities are struggling to deal with urban migration and development in flood-ridden areas β€” China faced this issue most prominently during the devastating floods in Guangzhou in 2010 and Beijing in 2012 and Chongqing, while India is dealing with the influx of unregulated development in the wetlands. Urban flooding and issues with groundwater collection are becoming major issues not only in Asia, but in cities everywhere as they struggle to come with worsening flood impacts.

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Clearcast's ban on UK retailer Iceland Foods' palm oil TV ad, explained

Clearcast's ban on UK retailer Iceland Foods' palm oil TV ad, explained

For part of an ad campaign during the holiday season, Iceland Foods struck a deal with Greenpeace to reuse an old animated short film highlighting an animated orangutan’s home and how the palm oil industry negatively impacts its habitat. However Clearcast, the non-governmental organization that governs and pre-approves advertising in the UK, banned the ad from being shown because it apparently is β€œdirected towards a political end” β€” signaling a violation of the Communications Act of 2003.

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Corporations should be held responsible for reducing the number of disposable coffee cups, not consumers

Corporations should be held responsible for reducing the number of disposable coffee cups, not consumers

The coffee industry in the United Kingdom is growing rapidly and more than half of all hot beverages are served in disposable cups, a 2018 report from the Environmental Audit Committee found. Widely available to consumers, take-away coffee is now available in not only in cafΓ©s, but also supermarkets, lounges, recreational facilities and more. Disposable coffee cups are lined with a thin layer of plastic which makes them waterproof, but this seal cannot be removed properly by most recycling facilities, effectively contaminating the whole cup. Mistakenly, many people think that disposable cups are recyclable and put them in the incorrect bin as a result, showing that there is a clear misunderstanding from the public and causes extra work at recycling facilities who then have to pick out each cup from what can actually be recycled.

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Seattle moves to ban single-use plastic straws

Restaurants in Seattle must stop offering customers plastic straws and utensils by July 1 as the city makes its move to be the first major city in the US to ban them, following in the footsteps of the United Kingdom, which has pledged to do the same by 2019. The city first passed a ban on single-use food service items in 2018, beginning with foam and plastic take-out containers, but utensils and straws were exempted until the market matured enough to provide an affordable alternative.

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The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is so big, it could form its own nation

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is so big, it could form its own nation

Only one year ago, scientists predicted that the Great Pacific Garbage Patch β€” a massive floating clump of plastics located between California and Hawaii β€” was the size of France. Just recently the size estimate has been revised and it is now estimated to be three times the size of the French country, or two times as big as the state of Texas.

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